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HTC Source | October 22, 2017

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Google publicly supports HTC in battle with Apple over patent disputes

Google publicly supports HTC in battle with Apple over patent disputes

HTC and Apple have been going head-to-head over various patent disputes for years.  HTC has been bulking up its patent portfolio over the past few months and now it look like HTC has Google in its corner to lend a helping hand and make sure that HTC is not banned from selling Android powered devices in the United States.

The United States International Trade Commission is currently reviewing the Apple versus HTC case and its six-member panel is scheduled to announce its decision on December 6. HTC has a pretty strong defense set up, but it certainly doesn’t hurt to have Google throw some of its weight around.

In a letter to the ITC, Google explains that HTC’s Android phones should not be banned from the U.S. market even if they are found to infringe on Apple patents.  An HTC ban would hurt consumers by reducing the number hardware and software options to choose from.

[quote]Apple is the largest seller of mobile computing devices in the U.S.  Allowing this supplier to eliminate the competition from a fast-moving maverick competitor (HTC) could drive up prices, diminish service, decrease consumers’ access to the technology and reduce innovation.[/quote]

Google also claims that HTC’s Android phones “are helping prevent Apple’s iOS from becoming the sole viable mobile platform.” The six-member ITC panel is scheduled to deliver their verdict on the case on December 6. If the ITC does decide to ban sales of HTC phones, the President (Barack Obama) is the only one able to overturn the decision, but if he believes that the band could cause public safety concerns.

We have a feeling that the ITC will side with HTC, but that doesn’t mean that we’re not a bit nervous.  Do you think HTC will come out on top or will Apple succeed in banning HTC from selling Android phones in the U.S. market?

Source: BusinessWeek

About Nick Gray

Tech enthusiast, Android user and founder of the first HTC blog – Nick Gray has been blogging about HTC phones before most people knew what a smartphone even was. Over the years Nick has owned and tested dozens HTC devices and is constantly flashing new ROMs to his Android phones.

Comments

  1. Apple have succeeded in getting Samsung products banned in some markets so you never know. If it does happen most likely HTC will do a deal as they looking very strong at the moment producing both Android and Mango handsets. If they could get iOS HTC would gladly do a handset iPhone H or something.

    http://www.gadgetrophy.com/2011/09/most-popular-htc-handsets.html

  2. Frankenstein

    I doubt it will do any good. Apple’s been successful most of the time in these court cases already. They appear to know what they’re doing. Microsoft is winning by making handset makers, including HTC, pay up for using their technology. Hard to argue that you’re creating an original product when giving Microsoft money for Android is already an admission that you’re willing to use technology that isn’t yours. The smartest thing HTC could do is start pimping those Windows phones hard and eventually ween themselves off of Android.

  3. Jimmy

    Its hard to tell with this case because all the Apple cases (that I know of) that have won against Samsung are design infringements. In those cases, its obvious that Samsung copied because no other phone on the market other than the iPhone has a center home button that functions in the same way. It was really dumb of Samsung to try and copy such an obvious feature.

    In the other hand, we really have no idea the details of how HTC is going to fight this on-going case for their appeal and I’m sure T-Mobile and Google will contribute in the fight as the feature that Apple is targeting will effect ALL Android powered devices, not just HTC. Unlike Samsung’s case, their company is the only one affected because of design which is the company’s internal decision.